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Proxima B

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- Tue, 30 Aug 2016 14:37:51 EST Y3T9nNnZ No.56342
File: 1472582271909.jpg -(375675B / 366.87KB, 1920x1247) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Proxima B
So it looks like Proxima Centauri has a planet in the habitable zone. It has an earth-like mass.

Proxima Centauri is a red dwarf that's about 4 light years away, and is as close as other stars get to us. We could maybe drive a small satelite there in about 25 years without scifi tech. http://www.popularmechanics.com/space/deep-space/a22567/interstellar-travel-proxima-b/

It will make an interesting target for upcoming telescoper.
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Kiyotsugu Hirayama - Wed, 31 Aug 2016 00:55:21 EST rszf0FN0 No.56347 Reply
1472619321375.png -(359924B / 351.49KB, 800x474) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
NAO
DO IT NAO
future launchpad to the stars 4 lyfe
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Heinrich Olbers - Sat, 03 Sep 2016 08:39:30 EST mk2O49eg No.56384 Reply
Even assuming we can get a satellite there, how would we retrieve the data it collects? There's no way its radio output will be powerful enough to be detected over that of the star or space dust, so it'd have to physically return to the Solar System (taking another 25 years in the process), looping around the star in a maneuvre involving insane lateral Gs that'd tear the poor thing apart. And then there's the interstellar debris.
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Heinrich Olbers - Sat, 03 Sep 2016 08:39:29 EST mk2O49eg No.56385 Reply
Even assuming we can get a satellite there, how would we retrieve the data it collects? There's no way its radio output will be powerful enough to be detected over that of the star or space dust, so it'd have to physically return to the Solar System (taking another 25 years in the process), looping around the star in a maneuvre involving insane lateral Gs that'd tear the poor thing apart. And then there's the interstellar debris.
>>
Georges-Henri Lemaitre - Sat, 03 Sep 2016 08:48:51 EST tQX5ylFX No.56389 Reply
>>56384
shit we only sent two things out of system. Is voy 2 out yet i forget, bu tits going. How the fuck do they just expect to sling an interstellar sub light flight? And the sublight coms delay of how many years?
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Tycho Brahe - Sun, 04 Sep 2016 01:11:14 EST rszf0FN0 No.56399 Reply
>>56384
Laser communication. Read the actual proposal. (Breakthrough Starshot, google it I'm not your secretary)
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William Fowler - Sun, 04 Sep 2016 01:37:57 EST tQX5ylFX No.56400 Reply
>>56399
lasers are still light speed though. I could use a string and two cups to speak over long distances but it's still going to go at the speed of sound.
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Tycho Brahe - Sun, 04 Sep 2016 01:39:15 EST rszf0FN0 No.56402 Reply
>>56400
Yeah, but the ship isn't traveling at lightspeed. It takes 20 years to get there because it's only going ~20% the speed of light, Proxima is only 4 light years away.
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Anders Angstrom - Tue, 06 Sep 2016 17:24:16 EST tQX5ylFX No.56408 Reply
>>56402
and it still takes a 5 second delay to talk to the moon and it's just right there.
I mean the delay alone isn't enough to derail the mission. Just look at all the Mars rovers. The delay is variable pending on the phase of the orbits of Earth and Mars yet they plan ahead and lay out a course only after surveying the area and doing at home tests. The same could be applied to this fight but the end delay is going to be huge both ways. Meaning it's going to take longer to plan and set course. But this time there is a time limit and that limit is a burn window. Miss it by even a second and the entire mission is fucked.

The challenges here are larger than any thing previously attempted. Not that it's impossible at this tech level it's just going to be really hard.
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John Bahcall - Tue, 06 Sep 2016 20:26:01 EST rszf0FN0 No.56409 Reply
>>56408
Breakthrough Starshot doesn't depend on probes with the kinds of capabilities you're talking about and doesn't have the same problems. The probes are a swarm of very tiny instruments propelled by laser pulses, so the problems of small errors in vector setting or micro collisions are negated by the size of the swarm; some will get through. Likewise being so small they will probably only be capable of the most limited telemetry and so there would be no need to wait for 8 year round trip control, it would probably just transmit until it lost power.

I think spaceflight in general falls under the category of things that are 'really hard to do', but thankfully it is a field where success or failure is an entirely technical matter, so sooner or later we will get it right.

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