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The biological singularity

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- Thu, 04 Feb 2016 19:54:08 EST 3xOkFk4I No.77623
File: 1454633648772.jpg -(147590B / 144.13KB, 1280x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. The biological singularity
the technological singularity is discussed and well known enough but wouldent the same assumptions more obviously lead to a biological one (assuming we are around after the former). the tech one is basically the unknown after we create a computer that can create a better computer than we can. however a computer (unless we specifically design it to) is not necessarily interested in procreation or its own survival. a biologically altered human though would probably still have those drives in tact (unless we remove it). not that an AI cant value itself and wish to spread or a modified human couldent do the opposite its just that its less likely. both are likely to be started by us but probably completely with very different motives. a biological organism -such as ourselves- is designed by evolution to spread and we may consciously remove that whereas an AI could develop it but it isnt an integral part of its original form. we are moving to a point where we can program genes almost as easily as we code an AI thus the exponential improvement in ability is just as feasible biologically as digitally. consciousness dosent automatically lead to a desire to continue; the childless humans (and more so the suicidal) have evidence to share on this. why should an intelligence, without an inbuilt need for survival and legacy, necessarily adopt both?
fundamentally wed be in the same boat as with machines in hoping they dont turn against their creators but in practice we are more likely to empower and pass on our need to continue to the latter. hell, we might even be cheering it on; it would be much easier for us to embrace designer babies than really advanced software.

tl;dr: we will soon be able to make computers that can make better computers than us. after a slight time lag we will be able to create humans that cant create better humans than us. the former will have the advantage of being earlier but the latter is more likely to be inherently interested in advantage and promoting the same.
not that its even automatically a bad thing since our creations will exceed us (by definition in this case) and will be able to do more than us. they probably wont automatically (see what i did there?) feel a need to turn on us and may well consider themselves part of us in both cases.

thoughts?
1 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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David Blapperridge - Thu, 11 Feb 2016 13:44:59 EST cIUKn2oY No.77649 Reply
The danger of malicious AI doesn't lie in the Matrix type robot rebellion tho. It's more about whether AIs will fully understand the implications of their actions in the same ways we do. Unless you simulate a human brain, AI won't ever be human. It will be something else entirely.

For example, lets say we program an AI to protect and take care of us. The AI's prime directive is to keep humans safe, so true to it's programming it traps all us in a never ending stasis. It has our best interests at heart, yet it effectively ended humanity. Or you make an AI to perfect some product, and it decides to use the entire planet for computational substrate in order to do so.

Kind of a cop-out, but you get the point right?
>>
Sidney Fanworth - Fri, 12 Feb 2016 03:53:13 EST X6HIP3d/ No.77650 Reply
>>77649
No. In fact I think you are intentionally shilling misinformation
>>
Nigger Mucklepune - Sat, 13 Feb 2016 06:26:29 EST +DZfgoAX No.77656 Reply
>>77649
That's essentially the premise of the grey goo scenario which was dreamed up by Prince Charles. It's plausible but you'd have to fuck some shit up badly to have it happen. Bear in mind that for it to occur you have to have that sort of tech in the hands of fuckwits, and if fuckwits can get it, then there's more powerful technology in the hands of other people who are more competent and aware of the dangers.

I get your point but you're talking about design faults. People will test and experiment and build failsafes on anything that's high risk enough and only roll out something that can end life as we know it if they already have a way to stop it.

Anyway I think that it's also quite possible we'll merge with the machines. Superhuman humans will just be a stopgap or an option for people unwilling to become a sentient nanobot swam or join the network.

Graphing Woes

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- Wed, 03 Feb 2016 14:21:25 EST bATSxV63 No.77615
File: 4.jpg -(80085B / 78.21KB, 666x69) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Graphing Woes
If you have a graph where the different series represent different units (e.g. conecentration, pH, and a Ratio), what should you label the Y-axis?

In return, bountiful tits!

Mods, sorry if this meant to be SFW board. Just sandwhich my picture, if you could make it a delicious turkey sub that'd be swell
2 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Archie Conninghood - Tue, 09 Feb 2016 10:27:17 EST bATSxV63 No.77640 Reply
>>77616
I'm guessing you dont meant a log scale, just a 1 - 10 type dealie?
Seems like a good idea, i'll give that a playaround in excel.
Also, if I on the X axis I was measuring 4 different pH values, it would seem to make sense to just label them via the tube numbers.
However, apparently that is not acceptable for the report i'm writing.
I can't exactly label the X axis as pH either, as i've already got values for that on the Y axis and the Series.
Any advice would be much appreciated.
>>
press !QUHukXEvkY - Tue, 09 Feb 2016 12:41:05 EST MD/oThse No.77642 Reply
1455039665566.jpg -(21779B / 21.27KB, 468x441) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>77640
in excel you can use atleast two different y-scales.

and im guessing that youre plotting a titration?
in that case id say that the pH has to be in the y because it depends on the volume of added solution

could you just give us a brief run down on what your experiment is?
>>
Archie Conninghood - Tue, 09 Feb 2016 13:12:15 EST bATSxV63 No.77645 Reply
>>77642
Of course! I'm sorry, I should've led my post with that.
I'm writing a report for an experiment I did in my Intro To Pharmacology class.
The experiment is, "The Uptake Of Salicyate Into Yeast Cells".
It's to demonstrate the phenomena of the passage of weak acids and bases between lipid membranes.
The report centers on the manipulation of the Henderson-Hasselbalch formulae in order to determine the concentration of salt [A-] within the yeast cell.
I've managed to create a graph of the standard curve with no trouble (R2 of 0.9989, very pleased about that), but the last graph showing the relationship between pH, [Salicylate] and [Salt] (both inside the cell and the supernatant) is proving trickier.

Uni decisions

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- Thu, 21 Jan 2016 22:52:57 EST YFGLWvGz No.77548
File: 1453434777991.jpg -(10312B / 10.07KB, 275x183) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Uni decisions
Need some advice. Tossing up between continuing my bachelor of science (only completed 1 semester) or changing to a bachelor of agriculture which is aimed more at what I want to do (Agronomy) I feel as though I wouldn't get an agricultural job with a bachelor of science. And should I travel to a prestigious University to study? or study at the University in my own home town. Any advice is much appreciated as I am having a hard time with these decisions and 3 years is a big commitment and I dont want to finish one then look back wishing I chose the other one. I am Australian if that matters. Thanks
8 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Vehk !7HYGxe5v5c - Wed, 03 Feb 2016 03:58:54 EST /ZLfJIXn No.77613 Reply
>>77608

Yeah, because everytime the mods locked one of your shitpost threads or banned you from /lit/ they forgot to check the IP, it's all a a big conspiracy. It's obvious what you're doing and it's pathetic.
>>
Bombastus !lnkYxlAbaw!!7zlcjO/U - Thu, 04 Feb 2016 19:05:09 EST ElYFdcKO No.77621 Reply
>>77596
LMFAO. EHUEHUEHUEHUE. Please screencap that or yellowtext the story.

>>77585
In biology, biological cultural assistant, biology consultant, office data entry job, teacher
In chemistry, simple laboratory assistant, anal. org. etc. Oil. Pharma
In physics/math, any financial job, teacher.
those are just what i can think of within 15 seconds.

wheresmymotherfucking biology board

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- Thu, 31 Dec 2015 22:24:52 EST IaY1gFOQ No.77484
File: 1451618692877.jpg -(178474B / 174.29KB, 640x480) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. wheresmymotherfucking biology board
hey, fuckin, if i run a current through some shit, like a strong fuckin "im gonna connect extremely powerful device A to mains outlet but the wire's going through thistank of water

will it kill everything? even the microbes? even the tiny superhero antman?
3 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Sophie Chonkinchetch - Thu, 04 Feb 2016 11:53:58 EST wE3/tzia No.77617 Reply
>>77614
  1. Inoculate appropriate (liquid) culture medium with some non-pathogenic, non-sporulating bug.
  2. Split the broth between two sterile electrolytic cells (to rule out the influence of the electrodes or whatever).
  3. Apply suitably high voltage to one of the cell, for a suitable amount of time.
  4. Wait for the bugs to multiply, then compare optical density.
  5. Repeat.
  6. Report.
>>
Hugh Battinggold - Mon, 08 Feb 2016 01:10:15 EST FHFwCltH No.77635 Reply
Presumably it would eventually kill microbes.
One common means of transforming (aka introducing plasmids) into bacteria is elctroporation, which is essentially zapping bacteria with pulses of electricity. These pulses generate small pores in their membranes, into which plasmid DNA slips in.

However this is done in a highly controlled setting, high intensity bursts, and even that produces holes in their membranes, and even that kills alot of the bacteria. Its assumed that even if only 1% survives, in a culture of >1million cells thats no big deal, you still have 10000 cells that will produce viable colonies.

Now, after that little tangent, electric currents are used as a form of chromotography known as electrophoresis. Essentially when you run DNA or protein gels you separate by size based on charge. Since most molecules in the cell are either negative or positively charged, you would essentially tear the cell apart based on the charge of molecules within it. Even the membrane would be torn apart as the negatively charged head groups are pulled toward the cathode, with basic proteins pulled toward the anode.

What do you think about this structural formula /Chem

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- Wed, 06 Jan 2016 10:32:42 EST U3Z4vTFt No.77503
File: 1452094362490.jpg -(8204B / 8.01KB, 362x193) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. What do you think about this structural formula /Chem
Went from eating mushrooms and smoking dmt to willingly let this get injected in my arm. I've been taking it because it seems to make things normal in my waking hours but dreams are questionable. It's listed as having potential fatal side effects while i'm pretty sure DMT and psylocibin don't.

I was wondering if any chemists could speculate on the structural formula to me it looks very large compared to the simple structures of psychedelics, but i've never studied chemistry.

Here's more about the ingredients: Paliperidone palmitate is very slightly soluble in ethanol and methanol, practically insoluble in polyethylene glycol 400 and propylene glycol, and slightly soluble in ethyl acetate.

Invega Sustenna® is available as a white to off-white sterile aqueous extended-release suspension for intramuscular injection in the following dose strengths of paliperidone palmitate (and deliverable volumes of the prefilled syringes): 39 mg (0.25 mL), 78 mg (0.5 mL), 117 mg (0.75 mL), 156 mg (1.0 mL), and 234 mg (1.5 mL). The drug product hydrolyzes to the active moiety, paliperidone, resulting in dose strengths of 25 mg, 50 mg, 75 mg, 100 mg, and 150 mg of paliperidone, respectively. The inactive ingredients are polysorbate 20 (12 mg/mL), polyethylene glycol 4000 (30 mg/mL), citric acid monohydrate (5 mg/mL), disodium hydrogen phosphate anhydrous, sodium dihydrogen phosphate monohydrate, sodium hydroxide, and water for injection.

So what's your opinion should i continue to take it or go back to using psychedelics.
6 posts and 2 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Vehk !7HYGxe5v5c - Fri, 29 Jan 2016 09:08:56 EST VhvSklsj No.77594 Reply
>>77592

Your mother's fat ass.
User is currently banned from all boards
>>
Phineas Fengerdale - Fri, 29 Jan 2016 11:24:32 EST GgTTTkur No.77595 Reply
>>77594
I like butter on those buns to be melted first ;)
>>
A Wizard - Mon, 01 Feb 2016 01:24:06 EST Kym7F5BQ No.77602 Reply
I actually do believe in the formation of Reptilians and their science and tech knowledge he and that can possibly alter the dynamics and even up to and including humans technology

i want muthhaphuckin nickel

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- Sun, 03 Jan 2016 23:43:22 EST hW4hIjzS No.77496
File: 1451882602885.jpg -(58916B / 57.54KB, 540x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. i want muthhaphuckin nickel
Hello! Anybody has some idea how could i separate nickel(II) sulfate from copper(II) sulfate with common chemicals and equipment ? I feel like reduction to copper(I) than separation by solubility is the way to go, but i can't think of a practical method.
1 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Green Fox - Thu, 07 Jan 2016 21:00:45 EST /ODYWh0d No.77508 Reply
Ni2+ has a standard reduction potential of -0.26V

Cu2+ is at 0.34V

You can selectively plate either metal onto a variety of metal cathodes using a more reactive metal like iron as an anode... I think. You just dial the cell voltage down until only copper is being reduced.
>>
Isabella Drallerdock - Fri, 29 Jan 2016 16:19:26 EST TSHbcYDX No.77599 Reply
>>77497
If I had all those nickels I would put them in a sock and throw them down a hole to prove Gravity is as fast as light

Substituting Tryptamines

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!!1C9jE+w+ - Sat, 26 Sep 2015 02:19:51 EST SPL8SH61 No.77200
File: 1443248391492.jpg -(87160B / 85.12KB, 751x600) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Substituting Tryptamines
So precipitated by Bombastus I've decided to actually use my brain and time on handling drugs as opposed to just procuring them. I haven't been to school in years and I don't know anything practical about chemistry, just the names of lots of functional groups, not how they work. Anyway, that's just disclaimer.

What I want to talk about is tryptamines, and substituting therein. It was mentioned over in /psy/ that there's a way to convert DMT to 4-HO-DMT. As well as talk of changing 4-subs, to get things like 4-Bromo-DMT and 4-Vinyl-DMT.

I'm not exactly sure what my question is. I think it's a better idea for me to put this thread here and just read what more educated people say to each other. I guess what I want to hear is about how difficult it would be to change substitutions on existing tryptamine material.

Obviously it depends, but since I have no idea what I'm talking about, some examples I'm wondering about:
DMT > another unsubbed tryp, like DPT or MET. What would be entailed?
DMT > 4-HO-DMT or vis versa? I need to get up the gumption to extract DMT anyway; could I convert from there? I suppose that's gotta be easier that extracting alkaloids from mushrooms, separating 4-PO-DMT, from 4-PO-NMT, and modifying from there?
What about 4-AcO-DMT into either 4-HO-DMT or DMT? Working from there could answer a lot of questions about the nature of the 4-AcO-tryps as prodrugs. Also as Bombastus suggested that would make mail order psilocin a possibility.

Anyway, talk. I will do my best to keep up and ask not stupid questions.
27 posts and 4 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Bombastus !!HToBa9dh - Wed, 28 Oct 2015 16:39:30 EST ElYFdcKO No.77333 Reply
>>77331
I've only gotten into the alkyl substituted substances only a few days ago. I took 4-AcO-DET which is the first non-DMT substance I've ever tried. DPT is something to look at for sure, then.
But I think all creations can and should be done with DET instead of DMT considering the stability and relative similarities to DMT molecules.

>>77326
Why is DPT hard to dose? Can't you just eat it?
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Fiend !!1C9jE+w+ - Wed, 28 Oct 2015 21:54:39 EST dnZGP2Dj No.77335 Reply
>>77333
Eating it is a massive waste of material, and snorting it is vile beyond anything. Plugging it was far less effective than snorting, also a waste of my money, and injecting it is problematic since it is not wonderfully soluble in water. IM was by far the best route, I just was using several of the 1ml insulin syringes that are easily accesible in US pharmacies.
>>
Beatrice Fanford - Tue, 03 Nov 2015 11:21:50 EST Ja2fAPPl No.77350 Reply
>>77333
>Why is DPT hard to dose? Can't you just eat it?

>Although it was mentioned in TIHKAL that DPT is orally active, we found this route to be quite unpredictable when taking it without an MAOI. Recent reports indicate that propyl-huasca works very well using the standard amount of MAOI combined with 75-150 mg of DPT.

Pharmaceutical Chemistry

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- Thu, 03 Dec 2015 17:49:54 EST dhY+6e5d No.77401
File: 1449182994086.jpg -(14533B / 14.19KB, 259x194) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Pharmaceutical Chemistry
Are any of you guys pharmaceutical chemists? I want to go to college for it, but Im curious what your guy's work day is like and also what to expect from college, and what classes I'll have to take.
4 posts omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Phyllis Bosslehag - Sat, 02 Jan 2016 20:13:45 EST 0LQJvC/t No.77491 Reply
Its fucking hard.
Theres a lot of math and physics based math and constant algebra.

Also pharmacology and medicinal chemistry are pretty much exclusively graduate level.

So you would likely be getting a chemistry degree and then sitting on your ass unless you plan on going to grad school.
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Vehk !7HYGxe5v5c - Thu, 14 Jan 2016 17:56:02 EST 0kilcEvV No.77522 Reply
1452812162014.png -(666699B / 651.07KB, 1067x800) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>77491

One of the big boys of English-speaking pharmaceutical academia here tbh

> Theres a lot of math and physics based math and constant algebra.

> Theres a lot of math

Pre-calc, Calc I and II, and eventually statistics/bioinformatics. Learning new maths will probably make up less than a fifth of what you spend your time on, though you will use basic maths for almost everything you're working with.

> physics based maths

Literally understanding vectors, electromagnetism and other mostly linguistic or spatial concepts with a few formulas to plug numbers into/transpose mixed in.

> constant algebra

Linear algebra is not hard.

To answer your question, OP, the same paradox presents itself in PharmChem as in other subjects. If you love what you are doing, it will always be easy and you'll always be happy and successful at it. The problem is finding out whether what you think you love is actually something you will still love when you do it every day. You might love a band, but if you listen to them five days a week every day for four years, they might wear thin, and you might find that some of their discography isn't as hot as you thought. Pharmaceutical Chemistry is a stimulating, interesting and highly dynamic field of study, with great opportunities in employment and research, and skills that are transferable to plenty of other fields. There is a significant element of physics and maths below the glossy surface presented, though, and to do chemistry effectively and to do chemistry in a fashion that's rigorous enough to present to other researchers and the scientific community, you need the motivation to maintain a high standard in these methods. The maths and physics isn't difficult, and you can get through it if you just law down the hours, but if you don't enjoy the phy-math dimension of the course it will corrupt the entire edifice, and if you are forcing yourself to learn new material, your rate of attrition of lectures will be high.

Labs in an undergraduate courses are also not going to be what you expected - most of them are tedious, repetitive and based on a heavy foundation of theory. You'll spend more time maintaining meticulous data and writing experiment reports than you will doing experiments.

If you're serious about it you can find a lot of reward and fulfillment, and develop the aforementioned invaluable skills, but make sure you know what you're getting into beyond it's superficial properties (which rarely reflect the lion's share of what you'll be doing).

Ideas for senior project

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- Sun, 27 Sep 2015 07:11:37 EST D6W9PxnV No.77204
File: 1443352297709.jpg -(53741B / 52.48KB, 624x351) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Ideas for senior project
I'm planning to take a senior course on cancer research and do some benign project on cancer as my thesis.

I'm either going to expose cells to carcinogens and see of ways to prevent this, or basically use cancerous cells and see what can inhibit or affect cancer growth with some run-of-the-mill cancer drug unless something interesting is suggested. My uni can get me pretty much anything I want.

Thoughts? I don't want it to be a simple experiment since I'm seriously considering going into the field later and need something that will give me good insight. Signal transduction inhibitors, certain protein overexpression or underexpression, binding to certain proteins that are transported to the plasma membrane?

Anybody have experience with this?
7 posts and 1 images omitted. Click View Thread to read.
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Shitting Grimville - Sun, 18 Oct 2015 13:28:55 EST uGD5aNS6 No.77309 Reply
>>77245
Thanks man. It wasn't a huge impact factor journal because it was just a small manuscript. Not a bad journal but not a great one either.

As for how I picked that protein, well its a critical protein to axonogensis and neurodifferentiation. I did some basic experiments characterizing the effect, made some claims (hypothesizes) about why it was happening, then did mutagenesis on it, as well as used kinase inhibitors to block phosphorylation of the protein. So the original protein and base experiment was given to me and I ran with it. Was solid at the end though.

That is cool that you are working with astrocytoma, astrocytes being something that I am quite familiar with. Best way to figure out a target is to read papers, and when you get a good idea of the landscape as to what is known, start writing down questions.
If you can find the answer to that question somewhere, cross it off. If search generates no leads, keep it as a possible avenue. But don't go for the thing with nothing known about it right off the bat. Too risky, its a total gamble and you don't want to waste 6 months only to find out your research is fruitless. Save that for a Phd student who has that kind of time. Start with something that may have been confirmed to have a role but it is not entirely characterized, and think of ways to design experiments to further characterize its role. Have a list of them and try a bunch, because more than a few will not work for specific reasons and nuances related to that protein.

That make sense?
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Betsy Baffingmat - Wed, 06 Jan 2016 20:02:53 EST 9qBRUbDq No.77505 Reply
1452128573353.jpg -(225061B / 219.79KB, 1536x2048) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
You could do an experiment where you treat cells with sulforaphane (a plant extract with histone deacetylase inhibitor activity) in the presence or absence of a methyl donor (like vitamin B12 or SAM) that could push the system in one direction or the other by adding extra substrate for changes in DNA methylation. http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26703571
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Lydia Febblechan - Sat, 09 Jan 2016 14:16:51 EST FHFwCltH No.77512 Reply
>>77505
That's a pretty solid idea. Not too complicated, just need to make sure he orders folate/B12 and SAMe deficient media so he can control the dose.

a "sandwich" filled with FUSION

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- Thu, 07 Jan 2016 00:45:39 EST t9woUZlS No.77506
File: 1452145539580.jpg -(72742B / 71.04KB, 600x442) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. a "sandwich" filled with FUSION
>A sandwich is a food item consisting of one or more types of food, such as vegetables, sliced cheese or meat, placed on or between slices of bread, or more generally any dish wherein two or more pieces of bread serve as a container or wrapper for some other food.[1][2][3] The sandwich was originally a portable food item or finger food which began to be popular in the Western World. Today sandwiches in various versions are found worldwide.

>Sandwiches are a popular type of lunch food, taken to work, school, or picnics to be eaten as part of a packed lunch. The bread can be used plain, or it can be coated with one or more condiments such as mayonnaise or mustard to enhance the flavours and texture. As well as being homemade, sandwiches are also widely sold in restaurants and cafes, and are sometimes served hot as well as cold.[4][5] There are both savoury sandwiches, such as deli meat sandwiches, and sweet sandwiches, such as a peanut butter and jelly sandwich.

>The sandwich is considered to be the namesake of John Montagu, 4th Earl of Sandwich, because of the claim that he was the eponymous inventor of this food combination.[6][7] The Wall Street Journal has described it as Britain's "biggest contribution to gastronomy".[8]

lets bio enginer a sandwich?

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