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- Fri, 26 Dec 2014 02:34:37 EST 5BjIx1Ou No.75944
File: 1419579277601.jpg -(80538B / 78.65KB, 720x960) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Light
Is it visible without anything to reflect off of and if you cannot see the source of it? I'm in a room lit only by the computer monitor, waiting for someone by my open window at night and the thought just randomly occurred to me and I thought I'd hear your guys' thoughts on the subject.
>>
Nathaniel Brublingdale - Fri, 26 Dec 2014 15:54:58 EST QRBqdbaf No.75946 Reply
You mean in the vacuum of space
yes
In your room? the atmosphere can reflect it
>>
Phineas Daddlefoot - Fri, 26 Dec 2014 23:28:48 EST ThKw+JVu No.75947 Reply
Light is only visible when a photon hits your eye. Photon can be emitted or reflected and travels in a straight line.
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Nathaniel Blatherridge - Sun, 28 Dec 2014 11:58:19 EST jHoDdHLb No.75952 Reply
If you can't see the source, and it doesn't bounce, no, you can't see it.
>>
Rebecca Shakelock - Fri, 14 Aug 2015 02:55:12 EST NkX3onth No.76913 Reply
1439535312197.jpg -(89858B / 87.75KB, 1133x716) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>Literally thinking about this very topic today
>Through a series of events visit 420chan in the first time in years
>Hit random thread button
>End up here


Ohhhh mmmaaaaaaaaaaaaannnnnn
>>
Bombastus !!HToBa9dh - Sat, 15 Aug 2015 18:05:16 EST V1Ngvki3 No.76916 Reply
>>75944
light bounces off a lot of shit: walls, cloth, air, etc. the last one not so much but try the experiment at home.
go to a windowless room, turn the light off and just practice with a small, dim fleashlight
>>
Hedda Fanforth - Sun, 13 Dec 2015 16:31:39 EST YHmno3wJ No.77430 Reply
>>76913

even if you could violate the laws of physics to do this you would still need to do it in an environment free from gravity and close off the sides to prevent erratic protons escaping and the mirror would have to be a perfectly smooth surface of quarks gluons or some other subatomic particle and even still entropy would eventually cause the protons to just slow down oh god why am i even bothering
>>
Angus Novingstone - Sun, 13 Dec 2015 16:35:02 EST u8+Bwmjx No.77431 Reply
>>76913
or just ya know, use a half reflective plate that way some light passes through anyway
>>
Molly Sabbercocke - Sat, 02 Jan 2016 18:31:11 EST 5xtVf077 No.77490 Reply
1451777471784.gif -(2090770B / 1.99MB, 500x335) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
>>76913
Not so fast!
This isn't completely wrong.
If you could build a box out of PERFECT mirrors
and
If you could keep the mirrored box from losing ANY energy over time...
then following troll's procedure would result in
the input light bouncing around ~forever
However, you could never use the light for anything for anything or observe it, since doing so would consume the meager amount of energy stored by the endlessly reflecting photons.
There is an electromagnetic component to this as well, but I'm pretty sure that a PERFECT mirror keeps reflected radiation from losing energy due to electric or magnetic forces.
Given, perfect mirrors don't exist, and likely never will... however with really fucking good mirrors you could get the light to hang around for longer.
Cooling the entire setup to nutsack shattering levels would help with duration as well.

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