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Hydroxyl Free Radicals

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- Thu, 25 May 2017 14:43:57 EST +41/TUGa No.78663
File: 1495737837795.jpg -(549713B / 536.83KB, 1000x750) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Hydroxyl Free Radicals
I'm currently using kratom to isolate its alkaloids via oxidation > extraction and am starting to get concerned of possible byproducts of my reaction. I am not using lab grade glassware for the first steps involving oxidation with H2O2.

My main concern, is it possible for free radicals to form and possible trace amounts of metals in my final product. I'm basically soaking the kratom in H2O2 and agitating on low heat with small amounts of citric acid added, then that is continued until the material is almost completely dry where I'm assuming the leftover liquid is water since the H2O2 oxidizes the mitragynine and 7-OHM into mitragynine pseudoindoxyl. Can anyone experienced in organic chemistry help me out with this?

We only use cold water for the extraction of the oxidized kratom material so that isn't much of a concern as much as using metal pots and pans during the actual oxidation process. Should I be concerned of consuming free radicals once fully evaporated? Are there any possible byproducts that can form from doing this?

Thanks a ton and excuse my ignorance in chemistry, I don't know shit besides what I learned in highschool and my current research onto this topic.

The pic attached is the final product after filtration of the initial oxidized material through cold water into 5 then 1 micron filters then finally evaporated at low heat.
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Jenny Gashford - Tue, 30 May 2017 01:03:54 EST UoTssc8h No.78669 Reply
>My main concern, is it possible for free radicals to form and possible trace amounts of metals in my final product. I'm basically soaking the kratom in H2O2 and agitating on low heat with small amounts of citric acid added, then that is continued until the material is almost completely dry where I'm assuming the leftover liquid is water since the H2O2 oxidizes the mitragynine and 7-OHM into mitragynine pseudoindoxyl. Can anyone experienced in organic chemistry help me out with this?
Unless you can find a paper that confirms that this is possible with peroxide, you have no way of knowing whether this works, doesn't do anything, or converts the reactants into something else entirely. Just because mitragynine pseudoindoxyl is a metabolite of mitragynine doesn't necessarily mean you can just use any oxidant to get a clean conversion from one to another. You'll be more likely to succeed if you collect pure mitragynine via acid-base extraction and then oxidize it, probably with something other than peroxide.

>We only use cold water for the extraction of the oxidized kratom material so that isn't much of a concern as much as using metal pots and pans during the actual oxidation process. Should I be concerned of consuming free radicals once fully evaporated? Are there any possible byproducts that can form from doing this?
Free radicals do not persist in solution that long. nothing you can do with 3% peroxide is going to be more toxic than either the leaves or the peroxide solution.

>The pic attached is the final product after filtration of the initial oxidized material through cold water into 5 then 1 micron filters then finally evaporated at low heat.
Unless you added a fuckton of acid it's unlikely that what you have is much different from soaking kratom in water for a long time and then evaporating. Start with an acid-base extraction to get the alkaloid contents of the leaves.
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Hunter S. Nodson - Tue, 30 May 2017 01:32:25 EST 5wCuF3rA No.78670 Reply
>>78669
there are articles on it, it is documented my man. It takes a few minutes of google and there is plenty on the oxidation of 7-ohm into mitragynine psuedoindoxyl. I'll post it tomorrow when I get a chance though.

thanks for that reassurance, like I said I'm ignorant to this in all aspects and this is a learning experience for me so bare with me. We did though, I got the pH down to 4. As far as the difference between just soaking in water, we've tested it. It does not come out like this at all. The peroxide makes a giant difference. I do understand h2o2 wont oxidize much until the pH is lowered a decent amount.
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Graham Chunkinham - Thu, 01 Jun 2017 18:15:12 EST UoTssc8h No.78672 Reply
I still highly recommend acid base extraction so you can work with pure reactants rather than trying to oxidize the raw leaves. You have no idea how much oxidant to add because there are thousands of different compounds in the mix all with different oxidation potentials.

Also the paper you posted is an overview of a semisynthesis of mitragynine pseudoindoxyl from something other than mitragynine. I still can't find anything on chemically converting one to the other. Everything i've found so far involves bacterial or fungal metabolism to affect the rearrangement. The way I see it, it is very unlikely that you will be able to produce a sizable amount of pseudoindoxyl with household oxidants. I am kind of curious about this now though so I am still searching.

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