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420chan is Getting Overhauled - Changelog/Bug Report/Request Thread (Updated July 26)

Interruptions in the food supply

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- Fri, 23 Aug 2019 11:39:36 EST G7aWPnSJ No.90702
File: 1566574776301.jpg -(349885B / 341.68KB, 1600x872) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. Interruptions in the food supply
Anyone take this board seriously?

There's been a precipitous drop in oversight and inspection and enforcement of food safety standards. I feel like there will be an event or multiple events that will expose the fact that a lot of the channels through which our food is distributed have been corrupted to the point where clean food will become wildly expensive. I think this will happen by the beginning of next summer. The big things that are on sale near here are tomatoes and peaches right now and I plan to steam and vacuum seal squash this fall. You can get those little chest freezers for $100, and I've been putting stuff in there. Canned goods this fall are stock from last year, and if you're seeing fruit less than 70 cents a can, buy a few cans. Buy beans and peas and corn. Buy sweet corn and freeze it. Guys I think something's really up.

Anyone else stocking up food so they don't have to eat beans and potatoes next year?
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Polly Druzzleman - Fri, 23 Aug 2019 12:40:14 EST x2o6Y3Ti No.90703 Reply
>>90702
As someone who has actually studied the the global food economy I can tell you that your wrong, that is one of the most stable international systems, so if you live in the West you should be fine
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Polly Druzzleman - Fri, 23 Aug 2019 12:41:56 EST x2o6Y3Ti No.90704 Reply
>>90702
If you can explain why you believe this in a more clear and defined way then we could have a pretty cool back and forth on this extremely interesting subject.
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Jenny Hudgesteck - Fri, 23 Aug 2019 14:01:31 EST JiUKFiC4 No.90705 Reply
>>90703
I'm just not sure how stable the market is from the consumer's perspective, since supermarket prices have been fluctuating wildly for the past four years for chicken and produce. Talking to the produce buyers in the supermarkets they say that the price cuts were not as deep and didn't last as long this year, and they suggested especially buying canned goods for storage this year since the chaos caused by tariffs is causing people to have to pay more to source goods, and this will be reflected in next year's prices.

So with this in mind, look around at who is scrambling to fill the voids caused when reliable and trusted supply chains aren't there anymore and can't be stabilized with subsidies. It's a different class of product. Sizes of produce get smaller. Replacement products hit the market at the same price point (b sized potatoes, choice for the price that prime used to be, multipacks in the freezer section, and loads of fish from foreign waters, not all of which are clean. Canadian shrimp for example when tested by CBC revealed no traces of the use of antibiotics whereas shrimp from India was so contaminated they cited that it must be a lack of national standards at fault, not linked to a single processor, and this is the type of product that is gradually replacing the systems that our government is accustomed to regulating.

I'm not suggesting clean food won't be available, I'm suggesting that it will be expensive and hard to get. It doesn't take much of a disruption to raise the price of staple goods a few percent, which can cause lasting effects if there aren't social support programs in place to pick up the slack for the people who can't afford to take the hit. The people who can afford to take the hit can suffer nutritionally.
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Polly Puddlenire - Fri, 23 Aug 2019 18:53:15 EST ECFWgb5w No.90708 Reply
>>90707
Lack of nutritional diversity causes lower education outcomes in kids and lowered productivity in adults.
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Nathaniel Gindlewedge - Sun, 25 Aug 2019 08:32:21 EST AEj4pdPX No.90718 Reply
>>90702
I've been eating dirt and taking extra trace mineral pills in order to train my body to be used to ingesting weird foreign minerals and metals. Did you know that you can build up a tolerance to arsenic and a bunch of other toxins?

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