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How do I roads?

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- Thu, 15 Jun 2017 21:19:52 EST EUv5Djrj No.35222
File: 1497575992281.gif -(36997B / 36.13KB, 720x720) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size. How do I roads?
So I was "taught" how to drive (was told the absolute minimum and then they said "ok go for it") and.

Anyway nobody ever showed me how to navigate roads?

I'm pretty sure the numbers on buildings have a system to them but I can't quite figure it out? Like before GPS how in the actual fuck did the pizza guy know where your house was? How did he know from just the name of your road and street number?

That road could be anywhere in the city, but I guess the street number narrows it down or something?

I'm fucking serious right now. How does this shit work?

I'm terrified of driving, mostly because I'm terrified of getting lost. I want to become an EXPERT on navigation.
>>
Eugene Crashsine - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 04:58:43 EST zu0iIfNF No.35223 Reply
>>35222

Just get a GPS, dude.

back in the day they used paper maps, and the address numbers on the street are in a sequence. Depending on which way you're driving they'll go up or down. So they'd find the street, then drive along until the numbers start to get close before really paying attention.

Plus most people, once they have driven someplace, can reach that area again by memory alone. After driving around the same town for years you'd know how to get to every street, then ya just watch the numbers go up or down till it hits the one ya want...

All I have to do is drive someplace, then I will always know how to get back to it (within reason). But my first time I either need a navigator ("go left, take this turn, get into that lane, etc."), a map, or GPS.
>>
Simon Sammleware - Fri, 16 Jun 2017 09:21:58 EST ZmDSCijQ No.35224 Reply
1497619318254.jpg -(70657B / 69.00KB, 620x433) Thumbnail displayed, click image for full size.
The town I'm in is set up in quadrants, there is NW, NE, SW, SE, with avenues going East-West and streets going North-South with street/avenue numbers increasing the further you get out from the centre. So if you want to get to 55 Ave NW you go north from Centre Ave. 55 blocks.

Sometimes, but not always, house numbers are prefixed with the nearest street number, so you'll cross 6th street and the house numbers will go 601...603...605...

Of course, some places are just fucked and you have to have an idea of where you're going beforehand.

I'll often end up on the street I'm going to, slow down and try to spot house numbers. After you spot two you'll know if they're counting up or down.

>I'm terrified of driving, mostly because I'm terrified of getting lost.

Getting lost can be fun, you get to see areas you wouldn't otherwise have.

As for being afraid of driving, it pretty much boils down to how much you've done it.
>>
Archie Wuckleham - Tue, 20 Jun 2017 18:25:28 EST PzCyjbvQ No.35230 Reply
In the US, street numbers which are odd are located on the South or East side of a street. Even numbers are located on the North or West side of a street. The block numbers on a major street sign tell you which addresses are located within their block. So if you are looking for 2424 N. 7th street, first of all you already know it will be on the West side of the street because it is an even number (the left if you are going North). As you go up the street, you can look at street signs for numbers which indicate where you are in the block. You may pass 2200, then 2300, then 2400, woah slow down buddy you are almost there.

You can also familiarize yourself with your local region's style of street typing. Some cities will have a sequence where they go: Street -> Road -> Place -> Street

or something similar to that. This can help you if you know that places are always next after streets, or whatever.

Other tips:
>Blue reflectors indicate there is a fire hydrant nearby.
>If an emergency vehicle is coming in your direction on the opposite side of the road, you do not have to slow down or stop at all if there is a median. Just keep on goin'.
>It is legal in most of the US to make a U-turn at a red arrow. Check local law.
>White lines mean traffic goes the same way on both sides, yellow means opposite directions.
>The most common cause of engine failure is overheating. Keep your goddamn radiator working.

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